Monk Jakuren’s “Foggy mist goes up through pines in autumn twilight” (Hyakunin Isshu #87)

Translation
By Monk Jakuren (1139?-1202)
A passing shower’s
Dew as yet undried
While foggy mist
Goes up through pines
In autumn twilight
Original Japanese
Pronunciation
寂蓮法師
Jakuren Hōshi
むらさめの
Murasame no
露もまだひぬ
Tsuyu mo mada hinu
まきの葉に
Maki no ha ni
霧立ちのぼる
Kiri tachinoboru
秋の夕暮
Aki no yugure
Literal Notes
Passing-shower ’s      
[At-all/in-the-least/the-least-bit/dew/tears/drops] also until/yet dry-not
Plum-pine/sow/plant/seed/scatter/sprinkle/strew/wind/coil/roll leaf to
Fog/mist go-up/rise-up
Autumn ’s evening/twilight
Autumn’s evening is a seasonal poetic symbol of loneliness and dreariness and rain drops are symbolic of tear drops. Maki is a plum pine but is also used for pines in general. “Maki” can also be read as “scatter” or “sprinkle” so you can read the third line as the pine’s needles are scattered while the fog rises up through the trees.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.